TOP 10 FILMS

Best Cult Films (1)

Battle Royale

 1. BATTLE ROYALE (2000).

In the future, the Japanese government have captured a class of ninth-grade students, forcing them to kill each other under the revolutionary “Battle Royale” act, a piece of legislation aimed at cleaning up the country by alleviating misbehaving, uncontrollable children. With the tagline of the film being Could You Kill Your Best Friend?, what unfolds is 2 hours of sheer mayhem, chaos, brutality, and true friendship.

 2. REPO MAN (1984).

A young, underachieving punk named Otto becomes a repo man after helping to steal a car, and haphazardly stumbles into a world of bizarreness as a result. After scouring the Internet for rare 80s films, I came across this little gem, a film that saw little box-office success; however, as time went on, it grew stronger and stronger, ultimately finding itself in the hearts of many “lost” souls.

 3. THE WARRIORS (1979).

In a future, rather dystopian New York City, cops and turf gangs rule the streets. When one gang leader attempts to bring all gangs together to wage war on the cops, The Warriors (of Coney Island) are framed for his murder. As a result, they have to covertly make their way back to Coney Island whilst the entire city hunts them down.

 4. THE THING (1982).

Researchers in the Antarctic are confronted by a shape-shifting creature which assumes the appearance of the person it kills. If you are an admirer of the Kurt Russell-John Carpenter partnership, this will not let you down. Carpenter’s typically disturbed animatronics are enough to keep you awake at night.

 5. OFFICE SPACE (1999).

A comedic tale of company workers who hate their jobs and decide to rebel against their greedy boss. A truly funny, compellingly light-hearted sitcom-like film with a masterful cast comprising such lovable and genuine characters. I never took to Beavis & Butthead or King of the Hill, so I was dubious as to whether I should watch yet another project by Mike Judge. By god, I’m glad I did. Despite its really eye-opening, depressing depiction of life in a bog-standard computer company, the characters alone, even without dialogue, have you in stitches!

 6. GHOST WORLD (2001).

Rebecca and Enid are social pariahs who, after graduating from high school, play a mean prank on a middle-aged nerd. It is truly difficult for any synopsis to do this film justice, as not much really happens. Nevertheless, it is a must-see! The cast (comprising Thora Birch, Scarlett Johansson and Steve Buscemi) is beautifully put together, and the storyline, with its witty, whimsical nature,  is certainly one of familiarity amongst the “forgotten about” generation.

 7. AIRPLANE (1980).

An airplane crew becomes ill. Surely the only person capable of landing the plane is an ex-pilot afraid to fly. But don’t call him Shirley. If you haven’t seen this film, do so now! You wouldn’t have the spoof genre without this remarkable piece of screenwriting and the typically brilliant comedic talents of Lloyd Bridges and Leslie Nielsen.

 8. THE BIG LEBOWSKI (1998).

Jeffrey “The Dude” Lebowski, mistaken for his millionaire namesake, seeks restitution for his ruined rug, enlisting his bowling pals to help get it (with comical consequences). If, as a film fan, you are also partial to some humorous quoting of film dialogue, The Big Lebowski will keep you going long into the night.

 9. THE LOST BOYS (1987).

After relocating to a new seaside town, two brothers are convinced that the area is populated by vampires (and not the lovey-dovey type you see on Twilight). Before there was True Blood, The Vampire Diaries, and Twilight, there was The Lost Boys!

 10. THE BREAKFAST CLUB (1985).

Five high-school pupils, all with different stereotypes, meet in morning detention, where they open up to each other, and discover how they have a lot more in common than they originally thought. John Hughes was the master of simple film formulae: the simplest storyline + a gifted bunch of teen actors = create a new generation of film fans.

Written by Conley Low

2 thoughts on “Best Cult Films (1)

  1. Some good picks. I wonder if all of these are considered cult films. What is considered a cult film? I personally wouldn’t consider Breakfast Club or Airplane cult films since they were hit movies. But that just goes back to your definition of a cult film.

  2. I know what you mean… it is a difficult genre to define. I don’t believe the box office success really has much to do with it. For Airplane, it almost single-handedly started a genre by itself – the spoof genre. That alone gave it a huge following as nobody had seen comedy like it before.

    As for The Breakfast Club, the reason I included that is simply that it had such an impact on high-school students and anybody who knows what it is like to be in a public high school or associate themselves with any of those characters. John Hughes was the master of writing stories that people can relate to in their everyday lives.

    Thanks for following my blog, Jimmy.

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